Author Archives: dgm

About dgm

Former IT professional, previously a digital archiving and repository person, ex research psychologist, blogger, twitterer, and amateur classical medieval and nineteenth century historian ...

And it’s not just magnetic media …

Now I know I’ve been banging on about the loss of knowledge as regards analogue magnetic media – audio and video tape – but yesterday I was reminded that it’s not just knowing about magnetic media that’s important. Yesterday when … Continue reading

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The dimming of the late 20th century

I’ve recently blogged about digitising analogue tape cassettes, and reading old 9 track tapes, both of which covered the problem of getting data back from old media. The equipment goes, people retire, and suddenly the data’s inaccessible. It’s inaccessible because … Continue reading

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Nineteenth century lunacy in the Cape Colony

A few months ago, I wrote about lunacy in the Victorian goldfields in the nineteenth century, or rather I didn’t, but I did pose the question about the treatment of the wandering disturbed who inevitably would have been attracted to … Continue reading

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What was thrown away and didn’t survive

The most recent post on the Christchurch Uncovered blog has been gnawing away at me over the past few days. In the post the author suggests that what we find in the archaeological record are those items that were seen … Continue reading

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Books and bookshops

I like books. Always have, and always will. And what I particularly like reading about is history, especially late antiquity and early medieval, plus a fascination with the Victorian era. And what I’ve learned about these fascinations I’ve learned by … Continue reading

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What 1860’s women actually wore to go swimming

Punch to the rescue: This rather charming cartoon from the 3 August 1867 edition of Punch (see http://www.victorianweb.org/periodicals/punch/seaside/15.html for attribution etc) clearly shows that most of the young women depicted are wearing a simple shift. Which makes perfect sense – … Continue reading

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Three men and a Bradshaw–a review

I’ve been reading a book – Three Men and a Bradshaw – which is an edited set of Victorian travel journals by John Freeman, a London clerk. John Freeman’s journals date from the 1870’s and are roughly contemporary with those … Continue reading

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